Millionaire Teacher Book – Video Testimonials

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Andrew Hallam

I’m a financial columnist for Canada’s national paper, The Globe and Mail, as well as for AssetBuilder, a financial service firm based in Texas. I’m also the author of Millionaire Teacher: The Nine Rules of Wealth You Should Have Learned in School (Wiley 2011) and The Global Expatriate’s Guide To Investing: From Millionaire Teacher to Millionaire Expat (Wiley 2015). My mission is to educate, motivate and inspire people on basic retirement planning and best practices for investing, using evidence-based strategies. I'm happy to comment on your questions. However, please read the Terms of Use.

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6 Responses

  1. Gary Moore says:

    Sure, I'd like a free book. Who wouldn't?

  2. Aren't consumerism habits what is keep economy going?

    But I am totally agree with you – I recently went through the planning exercise and if you add modest 2% inflation a year and 1-2% administration fee – you would barely make any money investing in the market.

    At those are modest numbers : -)

  3. Benjamin says:

    Just read the book. Great read. Planning on putting your plan into action for myself.

    Question, would you put 250k into the market right now with the index funds you have recommended? Or is the market about to tank big time with all this financial turmoil we can't but help to read about. I want to put your plan into action but I am nervous about an upcoming crash.

  4. Michael says:

    Hey Audrey F. great to see you promoting the book. You go girl!

  5. Neil Peart says:

    I have just finished reading your book. It is very well written and makes perfect sense to me. Paying off high interest credit card debt is obviously a no brainer but one question that did not appear to be properly addressed was the issue of (relatively) low interest debt, in particular mortgage debt.

    It is all well and good telling everyone that they should throw every penny they have into index funds from age 18, but what are you going to live in. We can't all live in 0 a month apartments 35 miles from our place of work after all.

    What if we have 2 children and a wife and a mortgage with an interest rate of, say 6-6.5%. Is it still best to put any additional money into these index funds which, as you readily admit can go up and down in the short term, or take the surety of paying down the debt.

  6. Robert says:

    Great book to read!

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