Manulife’s Funds Versus Index Funds

I’m continuing my Globe and Mail series, comparing Canada’s actively managed fund companies’ products versus inexpensive index funds.  

Based on personal emails, I’m popular among regular people.  

But Canada’s mutual fund companies see me as a mirage wrecker.  

I’m happy to be making friends where I should …

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andrew hallam

andrew hallam

I’m a financial columnist for Canada’s national paper, The Globe and Mail, as well as for AssetBuilder, a financial service firm based in Texas. I’m also the author of Millionaire Teacher: The Nine Rules of Wealth You Should Have Learned in School (Wiley 2011) and The Global Expatriate’s Guide To Investing: From Millionaire Teacher to Millionaire Expat (Wiley 2015). My mission is to educate, motivate and inspire people on basic retirement planning and best practices for investing, using evidence-based strategies. I'm happy to comment on your questions. However, please read the Terms of Use.

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1 Response

  1. Barry says:

    Re: The below, it had me wondering how a Millionaire Teacher who rebalanced would have performed in comparison

    “Total return differences were dramatic. After all costs, Manulife’s surviving funds earned 36.2 per cent; TD’s e-Series indexes earned 71.9 per cent.

    Whether the indexes are truly better depends on your perspective. Actively managed Series F products come with financial planning. TD’s e-Series products don’t. The best possible solution may be for an adviser-seeking investor to hire a fee-based financial planner to build a portfolio of indexes.”

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