My Own Advisor – Catching up with Millionaire Teacher and Expat

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Mark Seed recently interviewed me for publication on his blog. 

I compared stock markets to crocodiles in costumes. 

And I talked about the only kinds of people (you might call them quirky) who should be buying individual stocks.

Read the Inverview Here





Andrew Hallam

I’m a financial columnist for Canada’s national paper, The Globe and Mail, as well as for AssetBuilder, a financial service firm based in Texas. I’m also the author of Millionaire Teacher: The Nine Rules of Wealth You Should Have Learned in School (Wiley 2011) and The Global Expatriate’s Guide To Investing: From Millionaire Teacher to Millionaire Expat (Wiley 2015). My mission is to educate, motivate and inspire people on basic retirement planning and best practices for investing, using evidence-based strategies. I'm happy to comment on your questions. However, please read the Terms of Use.

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3 Responses

  1. My Own Advisor says:

    Thanks Andrew! It was great to get your advice to the masses 😉

    Mark

  2. Mark E says:

    Always fantastic! I actually started my own website recently about teacher’s getting ahead financially and of course you are case study #1. We will be talking investments, budgets, frugality, making the best out of your 403b and more. Thanks for all you’ve done!

    Prosperousteachers.com

  3. Daniel T says:

    This part was particularily useful as I was wondering if much has changed for Canadian based investors since the book had been published. When my accounts gets over 100K I’ll move it out of e-series TD index funds and into Vanguard “non-hedged” indexes as Andrew suggests to take advantage of these recent changes.

    “There are only two things I would add to Millionaire Teacher, if I were updating it today. When the book came out, Vanguard’s ETFs weren’t available. So I would add those. Plus, Canadians now have the option to buy ETFs that aren’t currency hedged. Investing in a hedged ETF is a bit like rowing a boat with a tennis racket. Better (non-hedged) products are now available. They’re much more efficient, so I would add those in the book.”

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