Millionaire Teacher Speaks – 13 & 14 July 2016

Andrew Speaks

 

I’ll be presenting two sessions at the Teachers Pay Teachers conference in Orlando, Florida on both Wednesday, July 13th and Thursday July 14th.

My first session is titled, “What’s Your Number for Financial Freedom?” (11am – Noon)

My second is, “Simple, Smart Investing.” (1:45 – 2:45pm)

For teachers who are interested in earning extra income, the conference also has a variety of experts who offer suggestions on how teachers can make money selling lesson plans online.  Here’s a link to a relevant article that I wrote:  Teachers Pay Teachers What School Districts Can’t.

 

Here’s the registration link

PS If you register for the TPT conference, let me know in the comments below. Maybe we can catch up while we’re there!





Andrew Hallam

I’m a financial columnist for Canada’s national paper, The Globe and Mail, as well as for AssetBuilder, a financial service firm based in Texas. I’m also the author of Millionaire Teacher: The Nine Rules of Wealth You Should Have Learned in School (2nd Ed. Wiley 2017) and The Global Expatriate’s Guide To Investing: From Millionaire Teacher to Millionaire Expat (Wiley 2015). My mission is to educate, motivate and inspire people on basic retirement planning and best practices for investing, using evidence-based strategies. I'm happy to comment on your questions. However, please read the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and the Comments Policy.

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19 Responses

  1. Mark Eichenlaub says:

    Excellent! Those people are in for a real treat!

  2. J.S. says:

    Hi Andrew,
    I am puzzled by the following. When using a brokerage e.g TD. and you have an example in your book about buying funds from them, it seems that we only get a written confirmation of the purchase ie Contract Note.
    But do we have some ownership document of the index itself like a share? Eg when buying a total index from iShares besides the money we deposit in the account and the confirmation of the purchase from the brokerage do investors have also a document of ownership of the fund itself?
    Thank you for your time
    JS

    • No J.S., they do not. This is also the case when buying an individual stock from a brokerage. If you want a certificate, you have to request (for the individual stock) to be placed in your name. You’ll have to pay for this. Then they will send you a cool-looking, very old-fashioned looking certificate of ownership. These are not available when you invest in ETFs, index funds, hedge funds or index funds.

      Cheers,
      Andrew

      • J.S. says:

        Then how can we prove ownership of the index and what exactly is transferred when changing brokerages eg for TD to SAXO? My question comes from thinking also the marginal case that the brokerage defaults. How are we “protected” by owning securities and not cash?

        • J.S.

          If you are really concerned about this, you’re better off buying individual shares, putting them in your name, accepting the certificates and then reinvesting dividends automatically. You will then own the shares…unless the transfer agent or the company loses the paperwork. When investing, there’s always going to be risk.

          Cheers,
          Andrew

          • J.S. says:

            Hi Andrew, I guess it is fine. I am trying to understand how it works.
            So for example when in p.198 you have an example about buying 370 shares of VDU from TD these units of the index does it have some serial number that identifies it? And is that serial number that I would see in my account?
            Does Vanguard have a record that it is person X that has bought 370 units of VDU or does Vanguard know only about the broker TD?

            Thank you for your time

          • J.S.,

            Vanguard would only know about the broker. But the broker is not legally entitled to sell your shares. They would belong to you.

          • J.S. says:

            Thank you for explaining this.
            I see now.
            So if I transfer my account from TD to DBS then Vanguard would link the funds to DBS after the transfer and due to internal house keeping of the brokers DBS would link the funds to me. But then if we buy US stock index from the US stock exchange how would the US tax authorities track us for estate tax? They would only know about DBS so I guess brokers give our data to US tax authorities.

          • J.S.

            I am not sure what you mean about Vanguard linking funds to DBS. Vanguard has simply listed ETFs on several stock exchanges around the world. Brokerages simply help you facilitate purchases of them.

            Cheers,
            Andrew

    • No J.S., they do not. This is also the case when buying an individual stock from a brokerage. If you want a certificate, you have to request (for the individual stock) to be placed in your name. You’ll have to pay for this. Then they will send you a cool-looking, very old-fashioned looking certificate of ownership. These are not available when you invest in ETFs, index funds, hedge funds, or mutual funds.

      Cheers,
      Andrew

  3. Emelyn says:

    Hello Andrew, Have you heard of Thinkorswim by TD In the US? We are attending a seminar by Phil Town this weekend about Rule 1 investing and this is one of the platforms that was suggested in the videos. Any thoughts on this? I have invested using TD e-series after reading your book. My sister invited me to attend Phil Town’s seminar here in Atlanta this weekend so I thought it would be good to ask you about this. Thank you. -Emelyn

  4. Ian Wallace says:

    Hi Andrew. I just finished your latest book and learned a great deal. I am a Canadian living in Zimbabwe, and I have no intention of retiring in Canada. I plan to retire in Southeast Asia in 17 years. I have an account with Saxo. I get paid in USD. Do you recommend that I invest on the TSX? Or do you have a better suggestion? Thanks.

    • Ian,

      As mentioned in the book, I recommend that you invest using the TSX. If you go with the U.S. exchange, your heirs will pay higher taxes.

      Cheers,
      Andrew

      • Ian Wallace says:

        Thank you. I’ve decided to go with 3 funds…CLU, CIE, and a bond fund…I’m thinking about VIE (Canadian short term), but am wondering if I would be better to invest in a US or Global bond fund. Are the returns similar historically?

        • Hi Ian,

          Thirty year returns would be similar. But consider the currency with which you will pay your future bills. If I were going to be retiring in Canada, one day, I wouldn’t want U.S. or global bonds, considering that my equities are already global. As for government or corporate, that’s up to you. If you choose corporate, ensure that they are investment grade, and not junk grade.

          Cheers,
          Andrew

  5. Ian Wallace says:

    Also, do you recommend government or corporate bonds? Don’t think I saw that mentioned in the book.

  6. Anthony Passalacqua says:

    Hey Andrew,

    Wow!!! What an awesome seminar at TPT! My name is Anthony! I went to all of your seminars in Orlando and sat in the front for most of them… I’m thinking you would remember me, since I was only one of about 20 men at the entire conference! I was telling you how I currently have my retirement money in a fund that has a designated age associated with the withdrawal… If you are willing to, would you email me at Mrpassalacqua2012@gmail.com… I only 2-3 questions I would like to ask you. Thanks so much in advance!

    Anthony

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