Should You Sell Your Investments Every May?

may-vacation

 

Note:  This post is a satire!

Haven’t you heard?

People have found that if they sell their stock market investments in May, then buy them back later, they’ll make a lot more money!

Image by Pixabay

Check this one out!





Andrew Hallam

I’m a financial columnist for Canada’s national paper, The Globe and Mail, as well as for AssetBuilder, a financial service firm based in Texas. I’m also the author of Millionaire Teacher: The Nine Rules of Wealth You Should Have Learned in School (2nd Ed. Wiley 2017) and The Global Expatriate’s Guide To Investing: From Millionaire Teacher to Millionaire Expat (Wiley 2015). My mission is to educate, motivate and inspire people on basic retirement planning and best practices for investing, using evidence-based strategies. I’m happy to comment on your questions. However, please read the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and the Comments Policy.

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10 Responses

  1. zoe says:

    Is this post a joke? If not, do the transactions fees justify the potential gains?

  2. Neil Goddard says:

    Wouldn’t selling and rebuying your investments kill you when it comes to fees?

    I suppose it would really depend on the size of your portfolio (and the fees) to know if it was really worth it.

    The article didn’t mention how you personally use this information in your investment strategy…?

    • Neil,

      This article was a satire, not meant to be taken seriously. My apologies. I should have been more sarcastic.

      Cheers,
      Andrew

      • Neil Goddard says:

        wow, i wish i didn’t spend all those subsequent hours analyzing graphs of the last 20 years. I even re-read this a few times looking for clues. Argh.

  3. Eldon Nesbitt says:

    A pal of mine missed the sarcasm too. Perhaps ending the piece with a very basic graph – showing what, on average, will happen if you leave the money in vs. if you park it elsewhere – would have woken up the readers that skimmed through without catching the sarcasm.

    • Thanks Eldon! I just added the caveat to the article’s opening. Scott Burns, my editor at AssetBuilder, told me that even the deepest sarcasm rarely works for money writers. He said the humour element of the brain gets turned off when people are reading about money.

      Cheers,
      Andrew

      • Eldon Nesbitt says:

        I apologize if posted my comment after you had posted the warning. I know it wasn’t there when I read the whole article yesterday but I might have been there before I typed my comment today.

  4. Ramona says:

    Hi Andrew,
    If is not too personal, would it be possible to submit a post or article on where your money is currently invested, why and its returns?

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