Here’s What Warren Buffett Wants You To Know

 

I put on a t-shirt and a pair of loose fitting pants. I then slipped on my running shoes.

At 3am, I left the Holiday Inn. It was May 6, 2005.I took a taxi down to Omaha’s Qwest Center.

Dozens of eager Warren Buffett fans stood beside the door. We were there for Berkshire Hathaway’s Annual General Meeting.

Many hours later, thousands filled the line.

When the doors eventually opened, I ran forward hoping to get a front row seat.

Image by Pixabay

Read the rest of the article at AssetBuilder.com





Andrew Hallam

I’m a financial columnist for Canada’s national paper, The Globe and Mail, as well as for AssetBuilder, a financial service firm based in Texas. I’m also the author of Millionaire Teacher: The Nine Rules of Wealth You Should Have Learned in School (Wiley 2011) and The Global Expatriate’s Guide To Investing: From Millionaire Teacher to Millionaire Expat (Wiley 2015). My mission is to educate, motivate and inspire people on basic retirement planning and best practices for investing, using evidence-based strategies. I'm happy to comment on your questions. However, please read the Terms of Use.

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1 Response

  1. Bindu says:

    Hi Andrew, I recently read your book Millionaire Teacher and it gave me lots of food for thought. Two questions – (1) if you want to leave unused investments to your children after death, should you balance your portfolio differently at the end of life? This, of course, assumes you have enough in your investments to do so without fearing a downturn in the stock market at an old age. (2) do you have any practical advice on how to implement the savings strategy starting at a young age for kids that you talk about in your book (other than collecting soda cans for 5 cent refunds)? I assume it’s never too early to invest for our kids but how does early investment on their behalf measure against helping them learn to invest themselves?

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