Hollywood Actresses Are A Lot Like Bonds

In 2006, Anne Hathaway made People magazine’s 50 Most Beautiful People list. 

That year, the actress had starred in the film, The Devil Wears Prada. 

Nine years later, the now 34 year-old beauty reported that she’s already starting to lose roles to younger actresses.  It’s a sad Hollywood truth. 

Time Entertainment reports that older male actors often get leading roles into their 40s, 50s, even 60s. 

Far fewer women do.

Once they hit a certain age, they become blasé, like a bond market index fund. 

Today, bonds rarely get respect.  Stocks have won their Oscars for seven straight years. 

Bond yields, in contrast, are lower than a drug-addicted actor in rehab. 

But that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t own bonds.

Image by Pixabay

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andrew hallam

andrew hallam

I’m a financial columnist for Canada’s national paper, The Globe and Mail, as well as for AssetBuilder, a financial service firm based in Texas. I’m also the author of Millionaire Teacher: The Nine Rules of Wealth You Should Have Learned in School (Wiley 2011) and The Global Expatriate’s Guide To Investing: From Millionaire Teacher to Millionaire Expat (Wiley 2015). My mission is to educate, motivate and inspire people on basic retirement planning and best practices for investing, using evidence-based strategies. I'm happy to comment on your questions. However, please read the Terms of Use.

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4 Responses

  1. Anand says:

    Hello Andrew,

    Nice Post!
    What are your thoughts on changing ones asset allocation based on valuations? Do you see value to tweaking ones portfolio based on it from time to time? Times like the the stock market peak in early 2000 for example. Wouldn’t it be wise in such situations to reduce stock holdings by some degree? Currently international developed and emerging market stocks are cheap. So coversly, wouldn’t you agree increasing their allocation in ones potfolio is a wise choice? If u agree, can u suggest a framework to follow? As in how much to increase?

    Cheers,

    • Hi Anand,

      This is something that most men try to do. And it usually costs them money, long term. It’s a bit like playing with a casino. I’m more dispassionate with my approach because I’ve seen the peer-reviewed studies that suggest people aren’t good at speculating (nor are the banks). If you rebalance once a year, you’ll always be taking some of the winners off the table and adding to some of the losers.

      Based on my observations, women are better at doing this than men. Men think too much. That’s why studies on brokerage accounts usually show that women’s returns beat men’s returns. Women don’t know as much as men. But they don’t mess around as much.

      Cheers,
      Andrew

      • Anand says:

        Point well made :]

        I have a suggestion for the next edition of your expat book.

        For Non-American resident expats, especially for those who live in countries with no US tax treaty, there are two kind of securities available – distributing and accumulating. Depending on the resident country’s tax rules, either one or the other might be more suitable. Correct me if I am wrong, but I didn’t see this info in the first edition and think a lot of expats might find it useful.

        Also on several pages, you recommend SSAC as the global fund choice. It has an expense ratio of 0.60%. While it does add simplicity and covers the entire world, a cheaper option would be IWDA + EIMI.

        Thanks Andrew. You book was instrumental in changing my view towards finance.

  2. Guy says:

    Hi Andrew,

    I just want to thank you for all of your help with making investing easier and finally transparent. I’m a Canadian expat and was wondering your current stance on Fundamental Index ETF’s? You gave some really good information in your second book and I was keen to build a portfolio of them but upon a quick search on TD Direct International, (CRQ) iShares Canadian Fundamental Index ETF and the other iShares Fundamental ETFs are not available as they’ve moved from the TSX to the Aequitas NEO Exchange.

    The only option I seem to find, to keep my funds in Canadian dollars is to invest in (PXC) Powershares Canadian Fundamental ETF.

    Your tone in your book and some articles you’ve written seems like you had some initial interest with them and I’m curious where you are at now? Also, are there any other fundamental Index ETFs available to buy in CDN dollars?

    Regards,

    Guy

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