Don’t Envy The People That Broadcast Business News

Last week, I was invited to speak on a business radio show.

While I waited to be interviewed, I could see the three hosts through a large, glass window.

They aired the business news. They reported on the price of gold and oil. They talked about bitcoin. They spoke about different currencies and how they were expected to jump around. They also talked about stock market levels.

Such up-to-the-second news isn’t easy on the nerves. It felt like a casino without the bells and flashing lights.

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Andrew Hallam

I’m a financial columnist for Canada’s national paper, The Globe and Mail, as well as for AssetBuilder, a financial service firm based in Texas. I’m also the author of Millionaire Teacher: The Nine Rules of Wealth You Should Have Learned in School (2nd Ed. Wiley 2017) and The Global Expatriate’s Guide To Investing: From Millionaire Teacher to Millionaire Expat (Wiley 2015). My mission is to educate, motivate and inspire people on basic retirement planning and best practices for investing, using evidence-based strategies. I'm happy to comment on your questions. However, please read the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and the Comments Policy.

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2 Responses

  1. Shawn says:

    Great entry Andrew.

    I’ve read a few articles describing how a portfolio can be compromised if the investor misses a handful of the best trading days. Hold (or hodl! for the crypto guys) is the name of the game.

    Only problem is that I started out with TD Eseries index mutual funds and later this year after RRSP season it will make more sense to switch to index ETFs.

    One part of me says, “Don’t think and just do it!” as the savings in MER will compound over time. The other part of me will remember this article and wonder if the day I sell the eseries and purchase corresponding ETFs will will be one of those “key days”.

    Exciting but a bit stressful. Not what indexing is supped to be lol.

    • Hi Shawn,

      Just do it, as the Nike slogan said. And don’t bother to look at “what might have been.” After all, the difference will be minimal, and it could go either way. It’s not going to make or break your future retirement.

      Cheers,
      Andrew

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