Don’t Fall In Love With Your Favourite Stock Market

Imagine this: You’re 16 years old.

You’ve moved to a different district and it’s your first day at school.

You walk into a cafeteria full of strangers. One friendly teen walks up and says hello. You grab on to this person like bark to a tree.

Dozens of other kids go to this school, but they don’t appear as nice. They don’t smile as broadly and you haven’t heard great things.

Your friend, however, is thoughtful, funny, dependable, and he pumps up your ego. He’s your best friend for years, until one day, he isn’t.

Image by Pixabay

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Andrew Hallam

I’m a financial columnist for Canada’s national paper, The Globe and Mail, as well as for AssetBuilder, a financial service firm based in Texas. I’m also the author of Millionaire Teacher: The Nine Rules of Wealth You Should Have Learned in School (2nd Ed. Wiley 2017) and The Global Expatriate’s Guide To Investing: From Millionaire Teacher to Millionaire Expat (Wiley 2015). My mission is to educate, motivate and inspire people on basic retirement planning and best practices for investing, using evidence-based strategies. I'm happy to comment on your questions. However, please read the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and the Comments Policy.

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2 Responses

  1. Miwo says:

    Hello Andrew,

    My children are in their late teens. I am planning to recommend they buy VGRO in their TFSA accounts. This ETF is global equities and bonds and has low fees. They do not even need to rebalance.

    Based on a simple excel spreadsheet, they might be able to retire on these alone if they keep a modest lifestyle. Am I missing any big red flags with this investment approach?


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